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Sentence

Sentence

 A sentence is a group of words that makes complete sense, contains a main verb, and begins with a capital letter. Sentences are used:

  • to make statements:

I took some money out of the bank.

The shop stays open until 9 p.m.

  • to ask questions or make requests:

Can I help you?

Could you open the door?

  • to give orders:

Stop arguing!

Come here at once!

  • to express exclamations:

You’re driving too fast!

It’s so cold!

Sentence or not?

The examples in the section above all show well-formed sentences. None of the following examples are proper sentences:

‘Ham and eggs. And onions.’

Too much information!

‘Not at all, Joe.’

They are not sentences because they do not contain a verb: they would be acceptable in informal speaking and writing because they are easy to understand, but it's not a good idea to use such constructions in formal situations.

Simple sentence

A simple sentence normally contains one statement.


Compound sentence

A compound sentence contains two or more clauses of equal status, which are normally joined by a conjunction such as and, or, but. For example: 

Joe became bored with teaching

      And

he looked for a new career.

[main clause]

[conjunction]

              [main clause]

 

Boxers can be very friendly dogs

     But

They need to be trained.

[main clause]

[conjunction]

         [main clause]

 

 

 


Complex Sentences

A complex sentence is also made up of clauses, but in this case, the clauses are not equally balanced. They contain a main clause and one or more subordinate clauses.

A set of words that is complete in itself, typically containing a subject and predicate, conveying a statement, question, exclamation, or command, and consisting of the main clause and sometimes one or more subordinate clauses.

The Four Types of Sentence

There are four types of sentence.

A declarative sentence: A declarative sentence states a fact and ends with a period / full stop. For example:

  • He has every attribute of a dog except loyalty
  • I wonder if other dogs think poodles are members of a weird religious cult.

An imperative sentence: An imperative sentence is a command or a polite request. It ends with an exclamation mark or a period / full stop. For example: When a dog runs at you, whistle for him

An interrogative sentence: An interrogative sentence asks a question and ends with a question mark. For example: Who knew that dog saliva can mend a broken heart?

An exclamatory sentence: An exclamatory sentence expresses excitement or emotion. It ends with an exclamation mark. For example: In Washington, it's a dog eat dog. In academia, it's exactly the opposite

The Four Sentence Structures

A sentence can consist of a single clause or several clauses. When a sentence is a single clause, it is called a simple sentence. A sentence must contain at least one independent clause. Below are the four types of sentence structure.

A Complex Sentence.

A complex sentence has an independent clause and at least one dependent clause. For example:

  • Diplomacy is the art of saying "nice doggie" until you can find a rock.
  • When you're on the Internet, nobody knows you're a dog.

A compound sentence has at least two independent clauses.

 

A Compound-Complex Sentence: A compound-complex sentence has at least two independent clauses and at least one dependent clause. The shortest sentence in English: "Go."


Recap

  • A sentence is a group of words that makes complete sense, contains a main verb, and begins with a capital letter.
  • A simple sentence normally contains one statement.
  • A compound sentence contains two or more clausesof equal status, which are normally joined by a conjunction
  • A complex sentence is also made up of clauses, but in this case the clauses are not equally balanced.
  • Four Types of Sentence

Quiz for Sentence

Q.1

Rearrange the following jumbled words/phrases to make meaningful sentences.

A) Starving for/ B) They / C) are / D) Food.

a) BCAD
b) ABDC
c) BDAC
d) BACD

Q.2

Rearrange the following jumbled words/phrases to make meaningful sentences.

A) non violence/ B) was a/ C) follower of/ D) Mahatma Gandhi.

a) ABCD
b) DBCA
c) BACD
d) ABDC

Q.3

Rearrange the following jumbled words/phrases to make meaningful sentences.

A) Lost my/ B) I/C) Wallet in/ D) Bus.

a) DCAB
b) BDCA
c) ABDC
d) BACD

Q.4

Rearrange the following jumbled words/phrases to make meaningful sentences.

A) Indian and/ B) were served/ C) in the party/ D) Chinese meals.

a) BCAD
b) CDAB
c) ADBC
d) ABCD

Q.5

Rearrange the following jumbled words/phrases to make meaningful sentences.

A) Some money/ B) I asked/ C) lend me/ D) her to.

a) BDCA
b) CDAB
c) ABCD
d) DCBA

Q.6

Find the right sequences of the sentences.

P: on Sunday morning Q: to see whether it was time to go R: to play football S: Rahul jumped out of his bed

a) PSQR
b) SQPR
c) PQRS
d) PRQS

Q.7

Find the right sequences of the sentences.

P: that appears to be his biggest contribution to American policy. Q: The hour-long speech came as a last rallying cry before November's health insurance open-enrollment period R: and a bit of valedictory for the law. S: the last such period of the Obama presidency.

a) RSPQ
b) QSRP
c) PRQS
d) SQPR

Q.8

Find the right sequences of the sentences.

P: served as ports and trading centres in the Maurya and Gupta empires Q: Gujarat's coastal cities, chiefly Bharuch and Khambhat, R: and during the succession of royal S: Saka dynasties from the Western Satraps era.

a) QPRS
b) RSPQ
c) PRQS
d) SPQR

Q.9

Find the right sequences of the sentences.

P: travelling the world Q: who is now a citizen of Saint Kitts and Nevis, R: in self-imposed exile S: Telegram is supported by the Russian-born entrepreneur Pavel Durov,

a) QPRS
b) PQRS
c) PRQS
d) SQPR

Q.10

Find the right sequences of the sentences.

P: is only given by mouth because of its acidic stability. Q: Benzylpenicillin, procaine penicillin and benzathine penicillin R: but phenoxymethylpenicillin S: can be given by intravenous or intramuscular injections,

a) PRSQ
b) RSQP
c) QSRP
d) RPQS

Your Score: 0/10

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